The artistic side of engineering

Article Day 4.

The Brightest of Creatures

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/30/arts/design/creatures-of-light-at-american-museum-of-natural-history.html?_r=1&ref=science

What intrigued me?

— Recently I have seen a few pictures online of squids in Japan that glow a bright blue color and I found them very fascinating. I always wondered how creatures like this produce light because it’s such a rare and mysterious phenomenon. So when I read the headline about a museum exhibit opening that teaches people about how it works and the different creatures that produce light, I was interested to read more about the matter.

How does it impact me?

— Honestly, this news doesn’t really impact me a whole lot. It didn’t change my outlook on a drastic world problem or provide me with some insight into things happening around the world. I just found the story to be very interesting and thought that I could take away some cool facts from it. It does impact me in the way that it taught me more about sea creatures and how the mysterious ones at enormous depths can survive down there. Ultimately, it won’t change my life but I do like to learn little random facts here and there.

Important points?

  1. About 90 percent of creatures that live below a depth of half a mile are bioluminescent so they can see and survive at such depths
  2. Bioluminescents are used for a wide range of things, from being able to see to calling and responding in mating rituals of fireflies
  3. It is mostly used to present simple information in darkness

Aequorea Victoria: a jellyfish native to the West Coast that produces both blue and fluorescent light

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